Best hotels and hostels in Guinea

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Îles de Los

    Le Sogue Hôtel

    On a short stretch of private white-sand beach (entry for nonguests GFr15,000) that's swept clean every morning, this gorgeous hotel might well be the nicest place to stay in all of Guinea. The rooms are set atop granite boulders in among the trees and are subtly decorated in ocean-blue tones. The in-house restaurant, which is filled with the artistic flotsam and jetsam of the ocean currents, serves delicious seafood meals (around GFr100,000). All up it's a perfect retreat from the madness of Conakry.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Conakry

    Noom Conakry

    The brand-new, boat-shaped, Noom Conakry is where the city puts on its most sophisticated face. It's a face that comes with an infinity pool overlooking the ocean, several top-quality bars and restaurants, tree sculpture art and huge black-and-white photos mounted on the walls. And all that's before you've even entered one of the very swish rooms… All up this is one of the best-quality business hotels we've seen in West Africa. The pool is open to non-guests (per person 150,000).

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Conakry

    Hotel M'lys

    This small, central place is turning the Conakry hotel scene on its head. Gone are drowsy overpriced rooms and lacklustre service. In are business smart rooms in soothing whites and browns, back-and-white photographic art, warm and welcoming staff, a cool delicious lipstick-red cafe-restaurant and an outdoor garden bar. All for a price that can't be knocked. Its value for money means it is very often full, so try and book ahead.

  • Top ChoiceLodging in Conakry

    Pension Les Palmiers

    The doily-adorned couches, cute living room and caring owners make this one a five-heart guesthouse, if not a five-star hotel, and as such it seems to attract a diverse collection of business people, aid workers and the occasional tourist. The rooms are modern, and polished, with comfortable beds, reliable electricity, internet connections and plenty of hot water. There's a small garden with a teeny pool overlooking a beach that moonlights as a waste bin.

  • Lodging in Fouta Djalon

    Hôtel Sister

    This Guinean-Welsh run place on the edge of town is the exception to Pita's otherwise grotty offering of hotels. Pretty pink rooms have a pleasingly twee look and feel to them, and are set around a large courtyard. There's hot water and 24hr electricity. Yes, you read that right! Solar panels in the garden ensure its operation (after a while in Guinea you'll understand how wonderful that is!). The garden is full of vegetables and fruits, and the bar-restaurant with its plastic flowers on the table tops is a nice place to eat (mains around GFr70,000-100,000).

  • Lodging in Fouta Djalon

    Acacia White House

    It's hard to go wrong with this very friendly and helpful family-run guesthouse which has four spotless rooms and 24-hour electricity thanks to a back-up generator.

  • Lodging in Fouta Djalon

    Campement du Mali

    These two huts (with a third under construction) are on the edge of the escarpment close to La Dame de Mali. They are built to mimic traditional thatched village houses and are very basic, with no running water or electricity. But there are plenty of friendly folk around who might cook for you for a negotiable fee! Plenty of good walks are available from here. It's around 7km northeast of town.

  • Lodging in Conakry

    Riviera Royal

    More affordable than many of the city's top-end hotels, the Riviera Royal has a tropical-garden vibe with rooms in small blocks scattered under the palm trees. There's a huge pool, bar, restaurant, nightclub and various sporting facilities. At the time of research a huge new block of rooms was under construction and when this opens it might change the quiet, lazy-day atmosphere of the place.

  • Lodging in Conakry

    Hotel GHI

    Once, in a now quite distant past, this was the swankiest hotel in Conakry. Today it's fading rapidly but it still retains a lot of charm and offers good value for money. Rooms are of an impressive size and there's a pool overlooking the sea. It's a popular wedding venue so can be noisy at weekends. Prices don't include breakfast. Locals often know it only by its former name of Novotel.

  • Lodging in Îles de Los

    Hotel Magellan

    Set on an impressively rocky stretch of coastline, this French-run place has large rooms in individual chalets scattered around a big grassy compound. The accommodation is plain and fairly simple but it's all kept clean and there's an attractive bar-restaurant and a pool. The rocky coast does mean that swimming here isn't all that feasible.

  • Lodging in Conakry

    Hotel Coleah

    Smart, freshly painted mustard-yellow hotel with African masks on the walls and large, cool and comfortable rooms with impressive bathrooms. For Conakry it represents real value for money, but it's often full, which means booking ahead is wise. It's on a very peaceful side-street just off the busy Route du Niger.

  • Lodging in Fouta Djalon

    Campement de Doucki

    The village campement consists of three separate traditional thatched roof mud huts with two beds in each, mosquito nets, candles for illumination and a whole load of great food (breakfast, lunch and dinner are all included in the price) cooked up by the owner's wife. There are clean outside toilets and a washing area.

  • Lodging in Conakry

    Maison d'Accueil

    Essentially the only real budget accommodation in the city that foreigners are likely to be able to stay at. Conakry's Catholic Mission has clean, simple rooms in a peaceful setting on the edge of the central Kaloum district. However, being such good value for money (for Conakry) means that it's often fully booked.

  • Lodging in Conakry

    Sacha Hotel

    This is a cheap, comfortable city centre hotel painted in an unmissable lurid yellow. The cheapest rooms, which all face inward, are actually quieter, and therefore a better bet, than the larger, noisier and more expensive road-facing rooms.

  • Lodging in Fouta Djalon

    Hôtel le Relais de Mamou

    This impressive and fairly new place offers good-value rooms that are large and bright, with reliable evening electricity and hot showers. Some of the pricier rooms have sofas and desks. Downstairs is a relaxed bar-restaurant.

  • Lodging in Conakry

    Hôtel du Golfe

    The eye-catching red Hôtel du Golfe offers refreshingly cheap rooms, which are large and well-maintained. It's on a quiet side-street.

  • Lodging in Îles de Los

    Millefleurs

    Four bright orange rooms on the hilly crest of the island. It's all very simple but has a gentle charm.

  • Lodging in Îles de Los

    Konkoba

    Perched on the boulders above a delightful little beach are a handful of simple huts which, if they were almost anywhere else in the world, would be a classic backpacker hangout. In Guinea, though, the almost total dearth of visitors has meant that the huts have been allowed to fade and become tatty and quite overpriced. The in-house restaurant (seafood mains around GFr100,000) with its rasta vibes is a good spot to chill.

  • Lodging in Conakry

    Hotel le Rocher

    The service is friendly and personable at this small, central hotel, but overall the place is starting to show its age and comes across a little overpriced compared to what else is available. The deep, cool, blue courtyard pool is the hotel's biggest selling point.

  • Lodging in Îles de Los

    Le Bamana

    Set back from a long, brown-tinged beach with safe swimming, this is the most popular day-trip destination on Île de Kassa. It also offers accommodation in individual wooden chalets, but they're rather tatty and unappealing.