Private Half day wine tour - St Emilion or Medoc

Food, Wine & Nightlife in Bordeaux

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Tour description provided by Viator

Discover the Bordeaux wine regions during a half day tour. Choose your destination depending on the wineries you would like to visit or the grape varieties your prefer. Popular choices include St Emilion or the Medoc.
Choose your destination among the suggestions below: - St Emilion: Saint Emilion centers on the commune of the same name. There are several villages around the region that share the Saint-Émilion name, such as Montagne-Saint-Émilion and St-Georges-Saint-Émilion, and are permitted to label their wines under the same name. Merlot is the dominant grape in this area, followed by Cabernet Franc.The climate and damper, cool soils of the area make it difficult for Cabernet Sauvignon grapes to fully ripen and as such is less often used. The wines take a little longer to mature than the ones in Pomerol but are still able to be drunk relatively young for a Bordeaux (4–8 years). In favorable vintages the wines have a good aging potential. - Pomerol: Pomerol was first cultivated by the Romans during their occupation of the area. Up until the early 20th century the area was known mostly for its white wine production. The wines of Pomerol have a high composition of Merlot in their blends and are considered the gentlest and least tannic and acidic of Bordeaux wines. Cabernet Franc, known in this area as Bouchet is the second leading grape and helps to contribute to the dark, deep coloring that is typical of Pomerol wines. Due to the reduced tannins found in these wines, they can typically be drunk much younger than other red Bordeaux. The chateaus in the area are not classified, with the winemakers seemingly disinclined to devise one, although Pétrus is often unofficially grouped with the First Growths of Bordeaux. - Medoc: The Medoc wine region spans the left bank of the Gironde from the mouth of the river to the city of Bordeaux and includes the four famous communes of St-Estephe, Pauillac, St. Julien and Margaux. It is about 60 km north to south, and about 10 km wide, with around 10,600 hectares under vines and a production of about 50 million liters per year. All the wine made here is red and the main grape variety used is the Cabernet Sauvignon. - Graves: The Graves region is bordered on the north by the Garonne river and contain the sub regions of Pessac-Léognan, Sauternes and Barsac. It is known for its intensely gravelly soil.  While Château Haut-Brion was included in the 1855 classification of the Médoc, the Graves appellation itself was classified in 1953 for its red wine producers. White wines were included in the updated 1959 classification. - Sauternes: Sauternes is a subregion of Graves known for its intensely sweet, white, dessert wines such as the Premier Cru Supérieur classified Château d'Yquem. Wines produced in the region of Barsac, such as Premiers Crus Château Climens and Château Coutet are allowed to be labeled either with the commune name or with Sauternes. The three main grapes of this area are Sémillon, Sauvignon blanc and Muscadelle.

What’s included

  • Visit of 2 wineries and château (wine tasting fees not included) Private tour
  • Maps of the Bordeaux vineyard
  • 1 bottle of water per person
  • Transport by air-conditioned minivan (maximum 8 people)
  • Pick up and drop off at your hotel in Bordeaux
  • Worry-Free Shore Excursion Guarantee
  • Free WiFi access on board

What’s not included

  • Gratuities (optional)
  • Food and drinks, unless specified
  • Wine tasting fees (between 25€ and 30€ per person / per visit)
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