All-inclusive resorts can be a convenient and affordable way for families to travel, as they provide easy answers to the most vexing of travel questions: when is dinner? Where are we going to eat? What are we going to do? Can I have another Coke? For independent-minded families the DR is no better or worse than most countries – its small size means no long bus or plane rides, and the beaches and outdoor activities are fun for everyone. At the same time, navigating the cities can be challenging for parents and exhausting for children. For excellent general advice on traveling with children, check out Lonely Planet’s Travel with Children.

Practicalities

All-inclusive resorts have the best child-specific facilities and services, from high chairs in the restaurants to child care and children’s programming. That said, not all resorts cater to families with young children (some even have adults-only policies). Independent travelers will have a harder time finding facilities designed for children.

Child safety seats are not common, even in private cars, and are almost unheard of in taxis or buses. If you bring your own car seat – and it’s one that can adapt to a number of different cars – you may be able to use it at least some of the time.

Breastfeeding babies in public is not totally taboo, but nor is it common. It is definitely not done in restaurants, as in the US and some other countries. Nursing mothers are recommended to find a private park bench and use a shawl or other covering. Major grocery stores sell many of the same brands of baby food and diapers (nappies) as in the US.