Must see attractions in Møn, Falster & Lolland

  • Top ChoiceSights in Møn

    Klekkende Høj

    Viewed from the car park, this neolithic tumulus looks little more than a grassy knoll on a contoured field. But walk 300m through the cornfield and you'll find that there's a double-holed entry into two passageways. They're barely 1m high but if you can overcome claustrophobia and crawl through the northern one, you'll be rewarded with a thrilling sight: faintly lit behind a glass screen within is a burial chamber complete with grave-goods and several skulls dating back 5000-plus years.

  • Top ChoiceSights in Møn

    Keldby Kirke

    Some of Denmark’s most memorable frescoes are splashed across the walls and ceiling of Keldby’s 13th-century brick church. The oldest (1275) yet most sophisticated decorate the chancel walls. But most intriguing are the naive biblical scenes added around 1500 by the ‘Elmelunde master’, with unicorns, demons dragging the damned into a devil's mouth and a serpent with a human-headed tail handing out apples. The medieval altarpiece is superb, filled with carved gilt figures.

  • Top ChoiceSights in Møn

    Fanefjord Kirke

    In a rural setting overlooking a pretty inlet, this splendid whitewashed church dates from around 1250, but is most famous for the remarkable frescoes on interior ceiling vaults that were added around 1500. Painted by the ‘Elmelunde master’, they form a cartoon-like ‘paupers’ Bible’ that you can partially decipher with the help of a laminated guide-sheet, available in English. Unique images include a gruesome image of Judas with two devils pulling out his soul; Mary on doomsday, tipping the judgment scales in humanity’s favour; and a gleeful horny-kneed demon listening to two women gossiping. Views from outside might appeal to watercolourists.

  • Top ChoiceSights in Møn

    Thorsvang

    Fastidiously detailed and highly atmospheric, this delightful collectors' museum nostalgically recreates 30 mid-20th-century shops and workshops, including a barber, butcher and cinema lobby and an easily missed schoolroom. Behind is a collection of tools, bikes and half a dozen cars, from a 1914 Baker Coupe to a 1971 Fiat 500. Even the ticket office is a marvel, dressed up like an antique grocery shop. At 11am, 1pm and 3pm there's a chance to go inside the WWII air-defence bunker, but the audio presentation of wartime reminiscences is all in Danish. Thorsvang is 800m west of the bus station, just off Rte 59.

  • Sights in Møn

    Møns Klint

    One of Denmark's most iconic landscapes, Møn's tree-topped white cliffs rise sharply up to 128m (420ft) above an azure sea with milky-blue shallows coloured by chalky run-off. Møns Klint is a very popular tourist destination and the most popular arrival point at the GeoCenter above the cliffs has a busy cafeteria, souvenir shops and picnic grounds. But none of this detracts from the natural appeal of the cliffs themselves or the lovely Klinteskoven woodlands behind them, with their networks of paths and tracks. At at least three points you can descend the cliffs by a series of wooden stairways.

  • Sights in Central Møn

    Elmelunde Kirke

    Elmelunde church originally dates back to the 1080s, but what makes it special are the painted ceiling vaults that, like the whitewashed stepped tower, were added four centuries later. Remarkable frescoes by the so-called ‘Elmelunde master’ illustrate garbled biblical messages, giving reminders of the shortness of human life. Notice the human-headed serpent in the Garden of Eden, Herod’s soldiers dressed in medieval armour and a devil leading the damned into the monstrous mouth of hell. While the frescoes here are similar to those at Fanefjord and Keldby, the church itself feels smaller and cosier inside.

  • Sights in Møn

    Liselund

    The enchanting gardens of Liselund were laid out in 1792 by Antoine de la Calmette as the ultimate romantic gift for his wife – the name means 'Lise’s Grove'. Paths wind their way between rolling lawns, under chestnut and oak trees, and idyllic lakes. A wooden 'Kissing Bridge' crosses a trickling stream in the woodland and trails continue to a viewpoint on the sea cliffs. Unusual buildings overlooking the estate lawns include a chateau hotel and thatched manor house. The latter, with its unusual spire, is open for tours (50kr) at 10.30am, 11am, 1.30pm and 2pm (Wednesday to Sunday, May to September only).

  • Sights in Møn

    GeoCenter Møns Klint

    The chalk cliffs at Møns Klint were created around 5000 years ago when calcareous deposits from aeons worth of seashells were lifted from the ocean floor. On the clifftop at Store Klint, the high-tech GeoCenter helps make sense of the geological processes through engrossingly imaginative displays (trilingual Danish/German/English), bringing other-worldly cretaceous sea creatures to life for kids, who'll love the inventive hands-on nature centre and artificial 'ice cave'. There are roaming experts to answer any questions.

  • Sights in Møn

    Museumsgården

    Museumsgården is one of Denmark's best-preserved farmsteads, its thatched buildings remaining much as they were a century ago, inside and out. Most fascinating are the early mechanical milking sheds and the very spartan sleeping quarters. Keen volunteers talk visitors through the historical context of farming as it changed in the 19th century, with tours at 2pm, and some days at 11am too. On summer Thursdays there are practical demonstrations. Turn off the Møns Klint road between Keldby and the golf course.

  • Sights in Møn

    Møns Museum

    Put on the headphones and let the audio guide (English, German or Danish) weave themed historical tales from Stone Age life to local 'smells' that give context to the carefully chosen exhibits. Each room has comfy chairs to relax in while you soak it all in, watched by the odd stuffed bird or animal peeping from between exhibits. The museum is within a fine 1813 building beside Mølleporten.

  • Sights in Møn

    Nyord Village

    Nyord Island's sole, eponymous village sports an octagonal chapel and a cluster of 19th-century tiled and thatched cottages, surrounded by idyllic gardens. Cars are banned (there’s a car park outside), so the loudest sound is likely to be the chattering birdlife. A couple of cafes, galleries and a cheesemaker cater to summer visitors.

  • Sights in Møn

    Liza's Gallery

    Liza Krügermeier's bright, striking art, along with works in similar styles by other artists, is displayed in one of central Stege's most beautiful half-timbered buildings, tucked behind the church.

  • Sights in Møn

    Høvblege

    In the shrubby fields of Høvblege, on the edge of the Klinteskoven forest, Denmark's last known population of Sortplettet Blåfugl (Large Blue) butterflies flutter among Møn's rare orchids. It's just west of Busene village.

  • Sights in Møn

    Klintholm Beaches

    Directly beside the harbour in Klintholm Havn are long sandy beaches. The eastern section is particularly pristine, with light-grey sand backed by low dunes and the best surf, but swimming is safer on the western side.

  • Sights in Møn

    Stege Kirke

    Stege's central feature, this 13th-century brick church is most notable for endearingly naive aspects of the 14th- and 15th-century frescoes in red and black paint (less extensive than the equivalents at Fanefjord and Elmelunde). Some look like they were painted by a demented nine-year-old: there are monkey-like faces sprouting from branches, a hunter chasing unidentifiable animals and a sorrowful man covered in big blobs (measles?). The murals had been painted over until rediscovered in 1892. A 1998 retouch makes them look almost modern. The church also has a splendidly carved pulpit dating from 1630. To get in, press the round black buzzer to the left of the west door. A 20kr booklet in English explains many of the interior features.

  • Sights in Møn

    Grønsalen

    Grønsalen is one of Denmark’s longest megalithic barrows (102m), dating back around 5500 years. Raised barely 2m higher than the surrounding fields, its sides are studded with 145 boulders and there are attractive views back towards Fanefjord Kirke. Access is from a little car park on Lammehavevej, 500m from the church: walk 300m south amid twittering skylarks and hopping hares. Four trilingual sign-boards add a little context.

  • Sights in Møn

    Kong Asgers Høj

    Northwest of Røddinge, Kong Asgers Høj is Denmark’s largest passage grave, its hemispherical grassy mound built over a central set of boulders weighing as much as four tonnes apiece. The entry tunnel is high enough to allow crouching visitors to shuffle in, but the 10m-by-2m burial chamber within is empty. The site is 1.2km west of Språve via Orehældvej.

  • Sights in Møn

    Mølleporten

    In the 1430s, Stege was ringed to the east by a moat and city wall pierced by three gatehouses. Built in layered brick and stone, Mølleporten (Mill Gate) is the only one still standing, having been narrowly rescued from planned demolition in 1873. It’s now one of the best-preserved town gates in Denmark. You can still see a section of dry moat beside it.

  • Sights in Møn

    Ulvshale Strand

    Popular with windsurfers, Møn’s best beach is a gently sloping arc of mixed white sand and grey stones curling along the Ulvshale Peninsula, which is edged by one of the few virgin woodlands left in Denmark (look out for adders). There's a car park right by the beach, around 6km north of Stege.

  • Sights in Møn

    Middelalder Have

    Directly west of Stege Kirke, the churchyard's small orchard garden has been planted with a labelled selection of medieval herb and food plants. Seeds are available for sale.