Bogotá is home to a well-established arts, theater and music scene. The city's best theaters are found in La Candelaria, while live-music venues dot the north, from grittier/trendier Chapinero to more mainstream venues in the Zona Rosa.

Theater

Bogotá is big on theater and has more than a dozen options. Left-leaning, politicized troupes dominate La Candelaria, while more mainstream options linger 'uptown' in the north.

Live Music

Clubs across town stage live music nightly, and outdoor festivals such as Rock al Parque are huge events that attract fans from all over the continent. Posters around town tout big-name acts, who play at Estadio El Campín, Parque Simón Bolívar, and Parque Jaime Duque (on the way to Zipaquirá, north of the city).

Sports

Many outsiders equate Colombia's national sport – football (soccer) – with the shooting of Andrés Escobar after his own goal eliminated Colombia from the 1994 World Cup, but seeing games here is generally a calm affair (wearing neutral colors isn't a bad idea, though). The two big rivals are Los Millonarios (in blue and white; www.millonarios.com.co) and Santa Fe (in red and white; www.independientesantafe.co).

The principal venue is the 36,343-seat Estadio El Campín. Games are played on Wednesday night and Sunday afternoon. Reserve your seats online in advance for big matches (decent seats go for between COP$200,000 and COP$350,000); otherwise, turn up at the ticket window before match time. For international matches, check with the Federación Colombiana de Fútbol (www.fcf.com.co) for locations that sell tickets or head online to StubHub (www.stubhub.co).

Bullfighting was banned in Bogotá in 2012 by Mayor Gustavo Petro, making the city's 1931 red-brick ring, Plaza de Toros de Santamaría, little more than an impressive historical circle. The decision was overturned by a Colombian constitutional court in 2014, however, and the battle continued through 2017 until bullfights recommenced, amid widespread protests.

Resources

Check out the online 'entretenimiento' sections of local papers El Tiempo (www.eltiempo.com/cultura/entretenimiento) and El Espectador (www.elespectador.com/entretenimiento/eventos), as well as Civico (www.civico.com/bogota), for event listings. For cultural events and commentary in English, pick up the free monthly City Paper (www.thecitypaperbogota.com). For schedules and tickets to many events (theater, rock concerts, football games), check Tu Boleta (www.tuboleta.com).