Shopping in Tibet

  • Top ChoiceShopping in Lhasa

    Dropenling

    This impressive nonprofit enterprise aims to bolster traditional Tibetan handicrafts in the face of rising Chinese and Nepali imports. Products are unique and of high quality, and they are made using traditional techniques (natural dyes, wool not acrylic etc) updated with contemporary designs. Ask about the two-hour artisan walking tour of Lhasa’s old town (¥50 per person, minimum five people).

  • Shopping in Lhasa

    Tromsikhang Market

    This bazaar-like area in the old town has the widest selection of dried fruit and nuts (imported from Xinjiang) and is the place to buy such Tibetan specialities as tsampa (roasted-barley flour), churpi (dried yak cheese) and yak butter. Khampa-style cowboy hats are for sale in the streets outside.

  • Shopping in Lhasa

    Barkhor Supermarket

    The souvenir stalls that once clogged the Barkhor Circuit were shepherded a couple of years ago into this three-storey concrete building with a Tibetan facade. It's quite charmless and there are no antiques here, but there's a good range of products, from butter lamps and prayer flags to monk's clothes.

  • Shopping in Lhasa

    Norling Supermarket

    Located near the Muslim quarter, this Tibetan-run Nepali shop sells everything from imported muesli and digestive biscuits to Indian spices, sun cream and dried coconut, though naturally at prices higher than in Nepal.

  • Shopping in Lhasa

    Dropenling – Beijing Donglu

    This convenient branch of Lhasa's best handicraft's shop doesn't have the selection of the main outlet but is good on stylish pillows, children's toys and even some carpets.

  • Shopping in Lhasa

    Baiyi Supermarket

    Boasts a wide range of foodstuffs from frozen squid to ripe pineapples to a bewildering array of dried yak meat. The upper floor contains one of Lhasa's best collections of outdoor gear.

  • Shopping in Shigatse

    Tibet Gang Gyen Carpet Factory

    This workshop employs local women to weave high-quality wool carpets. Upon arrival you’ll be directed to the workshop, where you can watch the craftswomen work, some singing as they weave, dye, trim and spin; you’re free to take photos.

  • Shopping in Shigatse

    Shigatse Tibetan Market

    In this grimy, open-air market in Shigatse's old town you can pick up low-grade Tibetan crafts and souvenirs, such as prayer wheels, rosaries and jewellery. Bargain hard. The street market just to the east is the best place to get a Tibetan chuba (cloak).

  • Shopping in Bayi

    Baiyi Supermarket

    Stock up on snacks for the road and lunches for hikes at Bayi's best-stocked supermarket.