Sights

Brasília’s major edifices are spread along a 5km stretch of the Eixo Monumental. At the southeastern end (maps usually put this 'cockpit' part of the design at the bottom) are the most interesting government buildings. To visit the sights along the Eixo on public transport, combine local buses 104 and 108 (R$2.50) with some long walks. Note that you will not be allowed to enter government buildings in shorts, sandals, sleeveless or crop-top shirts, or short skirts or dresses.

The other end of the Eixo Monumental can be reached from the local bus station – take buses 312, 331 or 343 from platforms C8 to C10 to get here (R$5, every 20 minutes).

The Setor Bancário Sul (banking sector) may not be the first place you would think of going to for cultural enrichment, but there are a couple of museums here. And guess what? They’re free!

Sleeping

Bank on spending more than you'd like to in Brasília, especially during the business week. Characterless high-rise chain hotels, crammed into the central Setor Hoteleiro, are the norm. Those in the SHN (Setor Hoteleiro Norte) are more conveniently located for shopping centers, but those in the SHS (Setor Hoteleiro Sul) are better value.

Rates listed are for weekdays; they can drop as much as 75% on weekends.

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Sleeping

Eating

Brazilians may say that Brasília is boring, but foodies flock here with abandon – the capital has one of the highest concentrations of starred restaurants in the country. Rather than there being a concentrated central food strip, restaurants are found out in the superquadras, in the commercial streets between blocks. Shopping centers are other eating hubs.

Where to Eat

The best restaurant selections are in the Asa Sul, around SCLS 209/210, 409/410 and 411/412, which forms a sort of ‘gourmet triangle’ (it is also home to some of the city’s most lively nightlife). Another good selection of restaurants is clustered in SCLS 405 and SCLN 412/413.

Elsewhere, Brazilians in need of sustenance head to the shopping malls. Three centrally located oases – Brasília Shopping, Pátio Brasil and Conjunto Nacional – all have food courts with enough variety to cater to most tastes.

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Eating

Drinking & Nightlife

Bars are found scattered around on the commercial streets between superquadra blocks. In general, the Asa Sul has more options than the Asa Norte, but there are good bars in both. Most nightclubs are on the edges of town.

For cheap drinks with the university crowd, head to SCLN 408/9 for a collection of options.

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Drinking & Nightlife

Entertainment

Check the online listings of Diverte-se Mais (www.df.divirtasemais.com.br) for live music and cultural events.

Outro Calaf is a landmark venue for live music in the center, while Clube do Choro has great performances in a more formal atmosphere.

Shopping

The crafts fair at the base of the TV Tower is a good place to pick up leather goods, ceramics and art.

You should be able to satisfy your other shopping needs in one of Brasília’s many shopping malls.

Saraiva bookstore (www.saraiva.com.br) has branches in Conjunto Nacional and Brasília Shopping, with a good selection of English books and magazines.

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Shopping