Attractions

Archaeological Site in Lamanai

Lamanai

Perhaps the most fascinating Maya site in northern Belize, Lamanai lies 24 miles south of Orange Walk Town up the New River (or 36 miles by unpaved road). The ruins are known both for their impressive architecture a…
Museum in Lamanai

Lamanai Museum

In the main administrative building where you pay your entrance fee, this small museum features artifacts unearthed throughout the Lamanai complex, including the original Stele 9 – the most detailed of three main ca…
Ruins in Lamanai

Mask Temple

The Mask Temple (Structure N9-56) was begun around 200 BC and was modified several times up to AD 1300. It has two 13ft stylized masks of a man in a crocodile headdress emblazoned on its west face to the north and s…
Ruins in Lamanai

High Temple

North of the ball court, across a plaza shaded by trees, is Structure N10-43, the highest at Lamanai, which rises 125ft above the jungle canopy. Few large buildings in the Maya world were built as early as this one,…
Ruins in Lamanai

Jaguar Temple

This temple (Structure N10-9), fronting a 100yd-wide plaza, was built in the 6th century AD and modified several times up to at least the 15th century – a fine example of the longevity of the Lamanai settlement. The…
Ruins in Lamanai

Stela 9

North of the elite residential complex, this temple was the original site of the intricately carved standing stone erected in AD 625 to commemorate the accession of Lord Smoking Shell in AD 608 that is now on displa…
Ruins in Lamanai

Ball Court

Not far west of Stela 9 is Lamanai's ball court, one of the smallest in the Maya world – but with the largest ball-court marker found yet! A ceremonial vessel containing liquid mercury, probably from Guatemala, was …
Ruins in Lamanai

Maya Structures

At the far north end of the Lamanai site, and often missed by tour groups, this large platform, 120yd by 100yd in area, supports several large buildings up to 92ft high. Next to it is a river inlet that once formed …
Ruins in Lamanai

Spanish Churches

Some 400yd south of Jaguar Temple are the remains of the thick stone walls of two Spanish colonial churches, which were built by Maya forced labor from the remains of a temple. The southern church was built in 1544,…