Grosser Garten

sights / Parks & gardens

Grosser Garten information

Prices
adult/concession incl Berggarten €5/4 Nov-mid-May, €8/5 mid-May-Oct
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Lonely Planet review

The jewel in the crown of the Herrenhäuser Gärten (Herrenhausen Gardens), Grosser Garten is grand both in format and history, having been laid out as a baroque garden in 1714 under the tutelage of the French landscape gardener Martin Charbonnier. The garden contains statues, fountains and the coloured tile walls of the Niki de Saint Phalle Grotto (creator of the city's much-loved Die Nanas sculptures, and opened after her death in 2002), providing a magical showcase of the artist’s work. There’s a maze near the northern entrance of the Grosser Garten, while the Grosse Fontäne (Great Fountain; the tallest in Europe) at the southern end jets water up to 80m high. From early 2013 the reconstructed Schloss Herrenhausen (Herrenhausen Palace) should be open – based on the original early-19th-century palace that was destroyed by bombing in 1943. The palace will mostly be used for conferences and events, but a Schlossmuseum, which should be open from spring 2013, will have temporary exhibitions on a Hanover theme and eventually will house a permanent exhibition. The cost of admission will be combined with park admission.

In summer a highlight is the Wasserspiele , water fountains that are synchronised to do some spectacular spurting.

The Illuminations are another popular summer attraction. Usually in August and September at 10pm or 9pm, the Grosser Garten is lit up for between one and two hours. Days vary, but the ‘Events’ section of the website gives dates and times. There are summer concerts, Shakespearean dramas and more, some also with illuminations.