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Yellowknife

Getting there & away

Contents

Land

Bus

Inconveniently, Frontier Coachlines is at 113 Kam Lake Rd, in Yellowknife’s industrial boondocks. Buses depart Monday through Friday, stopping in Rae ($30, 80 minutes), Fort Providence ($74, four hours) and Enterprise ($90, seven hours) en route to Hay River ($98, eight hours). From there, connections can be made to Edmonton, Fort Smith or Fort Simpson.

Car

Renting a car in Yellowknife isn’t cheap. A small car typically costs about $75/450 per day/week, plus 30 cents per kilometer, with 250 free kilo- meters thrown in with weekly rentals only.

Rent-a-Relic (867-873-3400; 356 Old Airport Rd; variable, call ahead) is dirt cheap, but you pretty much need a car just to get there. Downtown, try Yellowknife Motors (867-766-5000; cnr 49th Ave & 48th St). Big-name agencies such as National and Hertz are at the airport.

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Air

Yellowknife is the NWT’s air hub. Most flights from outside the territory land here, and most headed to smaller NWT communities depart from here. Brace yourself for high prices. First Air serves Hay River ($203 one way, 45 minutes, Sunday to Friday), Fort Simpson ($333 one way, one hour, Sunday to Friday) and Inuvik ($431 one way, 1¾ hours, Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday), while Canadian Northflies to Hay River ($203 one way, 35 minutes, Sunday to Friday), Inuvik ($431 one way, 2½ hours, daily) and Norman Wells ($347 one way, one hour, daily). Smaller airlines sometimes offer good special fares. Northwestern Air Lease goes to Fort Smith ($305 one way, one hour, Sunday to Friday), Buffalo Airways (867-873-6112; www.buf faloairways.com) flies to Hay River ($202 one way, 45 minutes, Sunday to Friday), North-Wright Airways will deliver you to Norman Wells via Deline and Tulita ($566 one way, four hours, Monday to Friday) and Air Tindi lands in Fort Simpson ($325 one way from Monday to Friday but just $180 one way Saturday and Sunday, 80 minutes) and the small Tlicho and Chipewyan communities around Great Slave Lake.

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