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Tucumán

Getting there & away

Contents

Land

Bus

Tucumán’s bus terminal (422-2221; Brígido Terán 350) is a major project with 60 platforms and plenty of shops and services. The bus information booth (430-6400) is outside, by the supermarket. The handy tourist office is opposite platform 12.

Sample destinations and fares:

Destination - Cost (AR$) - Duration (hr)

Buenos Aires - 148 - 16

Cafayate - 28 - 6½

Catamarca - 27 - 4

Córdoba - 69 - 7

Jujuy - 39 - 5

La Quiaca - 76 - 11

La Rioja - 43 - 6

Mendoza - 110 - 13

Posadas - 107 - 18

Resistencia - 74 - 12

Río Gallegos - 342 - 40

Salta - 33 - 4½

Salvador Mazza - 75 - 10

San Juan - 91 - 12

Santiago (Chile)160 - 23

Santiago del Estero - 15 - 2

Tafí del Valle - 15 - 2½-3

Termas de Río Hondo - 11 - 1

Train

Argentina’s trains aren’t what they were, but Tucumán is still connected to Buenos Aires (via Santiago del Estero and Rosario) twice a week from the beautiful Estación Mitre (430-9220) in the northwest of town. Services frequently take several hours longer than advertised, but it’s an experience a little like stepping back in time and might appeal to those in no hurry or on a strict budget.

At time of research, trains were leaving Buenos Aires’ Retiro station at 10.40am on Monday and Friday, arriving in Tucumán at 11.40am the next day. From Tucumán, trains left at 5.40pm on Wednesday (arriving at 7.10pm Thursday), and 8.33pm (no joke) on Saturday, arriving at 10pm on Sunday.

The trip costs AR$35/45/66 in turista (2nd class) /1st class/Pullman (reclinable seats), or AR$200 in a sleeper.

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Air

Aerolíneas Argentinas (431-1030; 9 de Julio 110) has three to five daily flights to Buenos Aires’ Aeroparque Jorge Newbery (AR$687).

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